science wrapping paper

Yet another experiment tested whether the perceived “quality” of the wrapping paper itself affected the subjects’ attitudes towards the gift. In this experiment, another 60 university students were given either wrapped, unwrapped or “non-traditionally wrapped” gifts (wrapped in brown packaging paper with neither ribbons nor bows). Probably not surprisingly, the nicely wrapped gift was the favorite, while the unwrapped gift was the least favorite. Even the plain brown paper wrapped gift was preferred over the one that was not wrapped at all.

But what does gift-wrapping do for the recipient ? Is all this effort worth it for the recipient? For example, do recipients actually like gift-wrapped presents more than unwrapped gifts?

This science fair experiment also serves to acquaint students with the essential processes of sciencing such as the importance of the use of a control, of identifying dependent and independent variables, of data collection, of pictorial and or graphic presentation of data and of being able to make better judgments as to the validity and reliability of their findings. They take on the role of scientists and in the process they learn to act as one.

Readily available from any supermarket.

To determine which food wrapping works best to prevent food spoilage in refrigerated and non-refrigerated foods.

On the information level, this experiment serves to acquaint students with current data on preventing food spoilage and the need to prevent food contamination from bacterial and mold infections and growth as well as from poor conditions of storage prior to delivery to our grocers and supermarkets. What becomes clearly evident and of prime importance is the need to preserve food to insure its safety and nutritional value. Becoming knowledgeable of the various products on the market claiming to prevent and retard spoilage and testing their efficacy is both a practical and useful outcome.

Wrapping with material sounds like a great, environmentally friendly way to go. I am considering making fabric bags for family gifts this year, not because of the waste of paper so much as because I hate wrapping everything up on Christmas eve and want to make it faster. Catherine´s latest amazing offering ..sharing Christmas.

I love wrapping presents and having them all under the tree for the big exchange on Christmas morning. In fact that used to be my job and I have started doing it with my girls as one of our family traditions. In our family presents aren’t hidden and only little bits come from Father Christmas, the main event is having them all decoratively waiting under the tree. But it makes me a little twitchy buying wrapping paper that is just ripped off and thrown out, and half of it is not really my style. We make some wrapping paper ourselves to give to other people, but to make all of it is beyond the girls and still has all that paper turning into rubbish. I have tried to recycle wrapping paper but it doesn’t usually last very long, so I need something to wrap with that:

We do something similar – I made some fabric bags with pretty Christmas fabric, and ribbons, and I just reuse them year after year. We made the first ones about 15 or 16 years ago, and they’re still going strong. We now have a collection of bags of different sizes to suit more or less any gift.

I looove this idea, and with so many crafty ladies in my family its sure to work a treat! Monique´s latest amazing offering ..Christmas Star Decorations.

Readily available from any supermarket.

This science fair experiment also serves to acquaint students with the essential processes of sciencing such as the importance of the use of a control, of identifying dependent and independent variables, of data collection, of pictorial and or graphic presentation of data and of being able to make better judgments as to the validity and reliability of their findings. They take on the role of scientists and in the process they learn to act as one.

On the information level, this experiment serves to acquaint students with current data on preventing food spoilage and the need to prevent food contamination from bacterial and mold infections and growth as well as from poor conditions of storage prior to delivery to our grocers and supermarkets. What becomes clearly evident and of prime importance is the need to preserve food to insure its safety and nutritional value. Becoming knowledgeable of the various products on the market claiming to prevent and retard spoilage and testing their efficacy is both a practical and useful outcome.

3 weeks. This includes experimentation and collection, recording and analysis of data, summary of results and completion of bibliography.

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