science project research paper

Save your document often! You do not want to work hard getting something written the perfect way, only to have your computer crash and the information lost. Frequent file saving could save you a lot of trouble!

Your final report will include these sections: Title page. Abstract. An abstract is an abbreviated version of your final report. Table of contents. Question, variables, and hypothesis. Background research. This is the Research paper you wrote before you started your experiment. Materials list. Experimental procedure. Data analysis and discussion. This section is a summary of what you found out in your experiment, focusing on your observations, data table, and graph(s), which should be included at this location in the report. Conclusions. Ideas for future research. Some science fairs want you to discuss what additional research you might want to do based on what you learned. Acknowledgments. This is your opportunity to thank anyone who helped you with your science fair project, from a single individual to a company or government agency. Bibliography. Write the abstract section last, even though it will be one of the first sections of your final report.

Remember to do a spelling and grammar check in your word processor. Also, have a few people proof read your final report. They may have some helpful comments!

Your final report will be several pages long, but don’t be overwhelmed! Most of the sections are made up of information that you have already written. Gather up the information for each section and type it in a word processor if you haven’t already.

From a practical perspective, the research paper also discusses the techniques and equipment that are appropriate for investigating your topic. Some methods and techniques are more reliable because they have been used many times. Can you use a procedure for your science fair project that is similar to an experiment that has been done before? If you can obtain this information, your project will be more successful. As they say, you don’t want to reinvent the wheel!

The best way to speed your writing is to do a little planning. Before starting to write, think about the best order to discuss the major sections of your report. Generally, you will want to begin with your science fair project question so that the reader will know the purpose of your paper. What should come next? Ask yourself what information the reader needs to learn first in order to understand the rest of the paper. A typical organization might look like this:

Title page (with the title of your project, your name, and the date) Your report Bibliography Check with your teacher for additional requirements such as page numbers and a table of contents.

Many science experiments can be explained using mathematics. As you write your research paper, you’ll want to make sure that you include as much relevant math as you understand. If a simple equation describes aspects of your science fair project, include it.

Graphic organizers such as a web or mind map . Mind maps are basically stating the main topic of your paper, then branching off into as many subtopics as possible about the main topic. Enchanted Learning has a list of several different types of mind maps as well as information on how to use them and what topics fit best for each type of mind map and graphic organizer. General to specific list . This method is similar to using a mind map except it is used in a linear list fashion by stating the topic and then listing the supporting details underneath. The general to specific list method works best when using a computer because ideas can easily be added without the information becoming “squashed” as would happen when it is written out. This method works in the following format:I. Topic.

When writing a research paper, you must cite your sources! Otherwise you are plagiarizing (claiming someone else’s ideas as your own) which can cause severe penalties from failing your research paper assignment in primary and secondary grades to failing the entire course (most colleges and universities have this policy). To help you avoid plagiarism, follow these simple steps:

You may find that certain science concepts and science terminology are not easy to find in regular dictionaries and encyclopedias. A science dictionary or science encyclopedia can help you find more in-depth and relevant information for your science report. If your topic is very technical or specific, reference materials such as medical dictionaries and chemistry encyclopedias may also be good resources to use.

Depending on your topic and your writing preference, the layout of your paper can greatly enhance how well the information on your topic is displayed.

Last name of author (or person you talked to), First name, “Title of article or chapter”, Title of source (book title , magazine title or “Conversation”), Place where published:Publisher name, Date, volume: pages.

*List the materials you used and what you did. If drawings will make it clearer, draw on separate pages and put in this section. Explain in detail things you made.

*Describe your interpretation of your results. Look over your notes, charts, and log and write what you think your data shows. You can put your opinions here. Was your hypothesis (what you expected to happen) correct? Don’t be afraid to say that you might have made a mistake somewhere. Great discoveries can come from what we learn from mistakes!

*Your project’s name (it can be in the form of a question) Your name, school and grade.

1.What causes dementia?

What is a good topic if I want to write about the chemistry of making candy?

2. Research for 5-15 minutes on the Internet on each of the topics you’ve chosen.

Can you suggest a research topic for grade 11?

Explain the results of your experiment and draw conclusions. State whether or not your hypothesis was correct. Include any applicable mathematical formulas and equations, since many science experiments can be explained using mathematics.

Explain the overall significance of your science fair project and how your experiment relates to the world.

Science fair projects bring to mind images of students in white lab coats conducting experiments and recording data in notebooks. Science fair research papers, however, have become a capstone to any successful science fair project. Science fair winners know how to write reports that prove scientific skills and impress the judges, writes science columnist and educator Dr. Carlson. A well-written research paper helps others understand your science fair project and may even improve your overall grade.

State the hypothesis of your experiment, the driving force behind your science fair project. The National Health Museum defines a hypothesis as a testable statement that predicts a possible explanation to some phenomenon or event.

Another important thing to consider is that your paper needs to be well-written in addition to having all the necessary components. Grammar doesn’t need to be perfect, but everything should be spelled correctly, and there shouldn’t be any obvious scientific inaccuracies. Write your paper early and spend some time proofreading it. Also make sure that others read your paper so that they can help check it with you. Writing a paper takes time, and rushing through it will probably end with poor results.

All Chicago Public Science Fair papers need to use the APA (American Psychological Association) format. For assistance, use The Owl for formatting tips.

Check the Science Buddies website to see some of the technical aspects of writing a science paper. (font, size, pictures, etc)

By including all the necessary sections in your paper, you make sure that you get the highest score possible. Nearly a third of the points awarded in the science fair come from the score on the paper; this means that every successful science fair project had a well-written report.

In water, it should take 1-2 minutes for the coating to dissolve and about 30 minutes to completely dissolve without stirring.

What will happen if we dissolve different amounts of colored Skittles in water and then try pouring one color of water on top of the other?

VirginiaLynne is an educator and mom of 5. Her Science Fair articles are based on her experience helping her children do their projects.

Get creative with the experiment by trying other liquids, or using other colored candies like gumdrops, Jelly Bellies, or M&Ms.

Type the heading “Procedures.” Press “Enter” twice. List the procedures you followed to complete your experiment. Note the constants and variables involved in the experiment.

List the names of anyone who assisted you with your project: your parents, siblings, teacher, classmates, or others.