computer science research paper

A typical research paper, such as one on computer science, should begin with an abstract which is typically a paragraph of about 150 words. After the abstract is the introduction which, just like the abstract, should be brief and serve to introduce the problem, outline the solution, and give a clear statement pointing out the importance of the problem and possible solutions to the problem. After summarizing the problem, the next thing would be interpreting any related work. This is the place where the writer points out any other works that are similar to those used in the research paper.

Such a paper would focus on sufficiently describing the detailed results with the aim of establishing and demonstrating the validity of those results. The paper would also identify novel perspectives of the results or point out things that are not so obvious about the situation or problem. The paper would also identify the importance of the results of the research being written about with the aim of indicating how these results improve or impact on the problem.

When asked to write a computer science research paper , or any research paper, one should always keep in mind that a good research paper is one that clearly spells out the problem it is addressing and the results achieved from carrying out the research. The research paper should also elaborate on what has already been done in an attempt to resolve the problem and identifying new developments aimed at solving the problem more efficiently. For instance, if one is writing a research paper on describing novel technical results, one may decide to explore the four available types of technical results – (1) namely the algorithm, (2) the system construct, (3) the performance evaluation, and (4) a collection of theories.

Once the introduction of the research paper is complete, the writer should now embark on writing the body of the paper and this should entail writing about the problem being covered by the research paper, the approach the research paper takes in attempting to find a solution to the problem, and the results of the experiment conducted while trying to understand the problem and seek viable solutions to it. Finally, the body of the paper is the main part of the Computer science research paper and it contains the most details about the essay. It should contain sufficient motivation and should also have some examples that illustrate the issue being discussed with the aim of enabling the readers to understand the issue better. The essay should then end with a conclusion.

This is a very popular book on a widely used optimization technique in signal processing. Convex optimization tries to find the provably optimal solution to an optimization problem, as opposed to a nearby maximum or minimum. While this seems like a highly specialized niche area, it’s of importance to machine learning and AI researchers, so it was able to pull in a nice readership on Mendeley. Professor Boyd has a very popular set of video classes at Stanford on the subject, which probably gave this a little boost, as well. The point here is that print publications aren’t the only way of communicating your ideas. Videos of techniques at SciVee or JoVE or recorded lectures (previously) can really help spread awareness of your research.

Popular among AI and information retrieval researchers, this paper discusses recommendation algorithms and classifies them into collaborative, content-based, or hybrid. While I wouldn’t call this paper a groundbreaking event of the caliber of the Shannon paper above, I can certainly understand why it makes such a strong showing here. If you’re using Mendeley, you’re using both collaborative and content-based discovery methods!

This paper was new to me, although I’m sure it’s not new to many of you. This paper describes how to identify objects in a video stream without regard to how near or far away they are or how they’re oriented with respect to the camera. AI again drove the popularity of this paper in large part and to understand why, think “Augmented Reality“. AR is the futuristic idea most familiar to the average sci-fi enthusiast as Terminator-vision. Given the strong interest in the topic, AR could be closer than we think, but we’ll probably use it to layer Groupon deals over shops we pass by instead of building unstoppable fighting machines.

This is another paper on the same topic as paper #4, and it’s by the same author. Looking across subdisciplines as we did here, it’s not surprising to see two related papers, of interest to the main driving discipline, appear twice. Adding the readers from this paper to the #4 paper would be enough to put it in the #2 spot, just below the LDA paper.

Y and x- return true if y and x are true; return false if either y or x are false. X or y- return True if either y or x, or both y and x are true; return False in case both y and x are both false. Not x- return true in case x is null or false; return False in case x is false. Y XOR x- return true if y or x is true; return s false in case y and x are either false or true.

Genetic Engineering of Humans Research Links.

Is using technology in college classrooms a good or bad idea? What is the best way for educators to incorporate social media in their classrooms? What is the best way for educators to use technology to teach? Should there be social rules about cell phone use in schools or the workplace? How are technologies changing the way people interact in the workplace? Have texting and social media damaged this generation’s ability to communicate in person? Do cell phones and social media make family relationships stronger? How has texting changed the way we communicate with one another? What are the dangers of texting? When is texting rude? Has texting made this generation less respectful of other people? Who decides?

Your Gamete, Myself: An article about egg and sperm donation.

Technology for open government. Computer security and privacy. Digital media distribution. Copy protection and peer to peer technologies. Electronic voting. Technology, society and public policy. Any other interesting or offbeat topic.

Computing, Operating Systems, Sustainable Computing.